Welcome to Following the Whispers blog

Thank you so much for taking the time to visit. Hope you enjoy your stay. I blog here whenever I feel the need. This blog was created at the time my memoir came out, in February, 2009. Its motto was: creating a life of inner peace and self-acceptance from the depths of despair. Now, my focus is sharing this journey we call life.

“Only one thing is more frightening than speaking your truth, and that is not speaking it.” Naomi Wolf

“We are called human beings, not human doings.” Wes Nisker, Buddhist teacher

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs…(And) if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly.” Theodore Roosevelt

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Telling the Truth Tuesday - Being quiet

This part of my spiritual journey is a time for quiet. It's a new place for me. I've always been one who has to talk about what I am going through. I still do, to some extent. But it's much quieter this time. It doesn't feel as if there are things churning up inside that I need to get out or I'll explode. I'm not in panic mode--anxious, frightened, desperate to move on to a more comfortable space. I am much more accepting.

There is a reason Native Americans honor their elders in ways our culture does not. Once I attended a Native American ritual. The elders were seated in a place of honor and treated with the utmost respect and dignity. When the meal was ready, the elders were served first. The whys of this are varied, but mostly, I think it is because elders have lived longer, learned much, and have come to a peace within themselves about life and living.

I am an elder in my family now, as both my parents and my husband's parents are gone. It is an odd feeling, because I am still hyper-aware of the younger aspects of myself still with me. But more and more, there is a wise energy that permeates my being, keeping me grounded and centered. And quiet.

Blessings,
Karen

15 comments:

Cyndi said...

So amazing that you've been able to settle down without all the churning, panic and anxiety. It gives me hope. While I'm not in full-on panic mode all the time, I am still anxious on a fairly regular basis. I see progress but look forward to getting to a quieter place.

Vicki Rocho said...

Send some quiet my way! I've got a slew of construction workers literally tearing up the street in front of my house. I just want some peace, a little quiet reflection and I get whole-house vibrating roars and thuds.

On the upside...I'll have a beautiful road when they're done...

Mason Canyon said...

Sometimes learning to listen to that quiet is the hard part.

Mason
Thoughts in Progress

Joanne said...

Sometimes it feels like that quiet does come from a place of wisdom that we might not have in our younger years. Maybe part of the quiet is a peace we've finally found, or carved, for ourselves?

Karen Walker said...

Cyndi, yes I am managing to maintain the quiet most days now. I do have my churning moments though.
Vicki, try maybe getting away from the house to find the quiet. I'm discovering how crucial quiet is to my well-being.
Mason, yes, learning to listen to the quiet is the hard part.
Joanne, yes, the quiet does sometimes come from that place of wisdom. Remembering to tune into it is the key.
Karen

Jemi Fraser said...

Sounds terrific. It's wonderful how you can see your journey, see your growth. :)

Helen Ginger said...

I think, in some ways, I am the opposite. I hold in and remain quiet. I recently was emailing with a friend and she was saying she hoped I could make the next get-together since I missed the last one. I reminded her I was there. She was shocked and said it was because I'm so quiet. And I do tend to be quiet. I'm a listener, not a talker. I'm working on being more of a talker.

Jen Chandler said...

Karen,

You are such an inspiration. I tend to run on panice-mode all the time! It may have something to do with the Adrenal Stress Syndrome, but I've always had a tendency to over react. It's good to know there's someone who has been through this, fought it, and has come to the quiet on the other side.

Happy Tuesday,
Jen

The Old Silly said...

Mmmm, nice ... love the tone and feel of this post. And can SO relate, too...

Karen Walker said...

Jemi, yes, I think it is a gift to be able to look at one's life and see the mistakes and the growth.
Helen, I guess that's okay as long as it's by choice and not fear. Listening is wonderful. But I'm learning that sharing myself - the real me - is a gift as well - for me as well as for those who I'm with. You are a gift and I am sure have much to contribute. Consider sharing that...

Jen, having a disease makes these things so much more challenging. Hang in there...it will come.
Marv, thanks, Old Silly.

Glynis said...

I have an inner peace now. This keeps me calm, and 90% tear free. Maturity has its uses.

KarenG said...

I've always been a quiet person. Everything came out in my writing. I started keeping diaries at an early age and now my journals are full of STUFF, that most other people would talk about but instead I write it. That's what keeps me quiet.

Tamika: said...

I'm so glad you have perfect peace! God is so good. I can appreciate hearing this because it assures me that time does bring about a change. Even if the change is only in me.

Tabitha Bird said...

I feel that wise energy within you. I have since I first 'met' you. It was one of the things that drew me to you :)

Patricia Stoltey said...

Karen, I think this is what I enjoy most about getting older. I still have my moments of anxiety or worry (I mean, do moms ever stop worrying?), but the ability to stop, sit, relax, and think, without a lot of internal churning, is becoming easier. I hope it just keeps getting better and better for you.