Welcome to Following the Whispers blog

Thank you so much for taking the time to visit. Hope you enjoy your stay. I blog here whenever I feel the need. This blog was created at the time my memoir came out, in February, 2009. Its motto was: creating a life of inner peace and self-acceptance from the depths of despair. Now, my focus is sharing this journey we call life.

“Only one thing is more frightening than speaking your truth, and that is not speaking it.” Naomi Wolf

“We are called human beings, not human doings.” Wes Nisker, Buddhist teacher

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs…(And) if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly.” Theodore Roosevelt

Saturday, February 6, 2016

some thoughts...

I was watching a news program and it mentioned that companies will pay 1/2 a million dollars to have an ad during the Super Bowl. Does anyone else find that disturbing? So many folks in our country are poverty-stricken, or can barely make ends meet. And corporations have that kind of money to spend so that more people will buy their products?

I was in Public Relations for years. I understand the need for publicity and I don't have a problem with it. But it got me thinking. What if all the companies that are purchasing advertising space during the Super Bowl took that money and did something charitable with it? And then the news folks talked about all the good the company was doing with the money and how many people were being fed or clothed or housed.

Wouldn't that make you purchase that company's product much more than an ad would? I know the advertising industry will hate me for this, but, oh well. I'm retired...

Just a thought.

Blessings,
Karen

9 comments:

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Karen - any unnecessary excess could be utilised so much more fairly, especially for those in need. So I agree - but someone would fill in the empty slot ...

I still buy what I want to buy - not what I see advertised ... in fact the simpler something is ... I'll buy it - but if it's overdosed: I don't!

Cheers and just enjoy being retired ... Hilary

D.G. Hudson said...

I took a few courses in advertising and all that matters is the bottom line. Does it bring in revenue...It's a nice thought that you have for helping the needy, but too many of the wealthy have little concern for those less fortunate. And for companies, they like the bragging rights to more profits for their investors. Some do help charitable causes, but too few, IMO.

Stephanie Faris said...

I think companies do that because the return on investment is SO big. They wouldn't shell out all that money if they didn't believe it was just a percentage of what they'd make based on that. With data analytics such a HUGE part of business today, I'm sure they see a HUGE spike in sales following those commercials...which is why they do it.

Karen Walker said...

Hilary, yes, I try to tune out ads as well, but it isn't easy.
D.G. I just heard that Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook is going to donate 99% of his stock to charity - her wrote it in a letter to his newborn daughter.
Stephanie, yes, I know, it's all about profits and sales. But should it be?

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

They are in business to make money. Just a shame that the NFL can command that kind of money.
Everyone is just watching to see which commercials will be the best. I don't think that many really connect with the product. (And the past couple years, the commercials haven't been that good either. You'd think if a company was going to spend that kind of money they would come up with something amazing.)

Karen Walker said...

Exactly right, Alex. It's such a waste.

Karen Walker said...

Someone told me I got the amount wrong - that's it's actually several millions of dollars per ad during Suer Bowl. I'm too lazy to research it today, but if it's more than what I posted here, it's even more troublesome.

Sharon Lippincott said...

Karen, IMO, the Super Bowl itself is a waste. We aren't the only ones who don't watch it. But it's an American institution and won't go away anytime soon.

This piece at the top of a Google search shows you are WAY under: Super Bowl XLVII and Super Bowl XLVIII both set the average cost of a 30-second commercial at $4 million. Super Bowl XLIX, also broadcast by NBC, surpassed that record with a base price of $4.5 million.

The cost of ads is set by supply and demand. It probably costs at least $100 million to put on the Super Bowl, so they couldn't do it without ads.

But I do agree with you that forward thinking companies could gain plenty of mileage with philanthropy. I think. Neuroscientists may disagree and talk about repetition deepening pathways whether we're attentive or not. 12 exposures to a flash ad may equal more impact than an article we merely scan and few see at all. Sigh ...

Manzanita said...

Karen
I have no idea. As I started reading this post and you said, "Moments of grace...." I immediately
thought, "What the heck are moments of grace?"